McKeon wants to take on leadership role after strong Rio showing

The quiet achiever of Australian swimming wants to have a big voice. Emma McKeon, who collected four medals at the Rio Olympics, has set her sights on becoming one of the leaders of the next generation as the Dolphins set off on the long road to Tokyo.

杭州桑拿

That’s not to say the current senior figures are on the wane. McKeon has emphatically backed Cate Campbell to rebound and says the best is yet to come from the world-record holder after her individual disappointments in Brazil.

But with fresh faces, such as gold medallists Mack Horton and Kyle Chalmers, now at the head of the pack, McKeon says she wants to add her voice to the leadership mix leading into next year’s FINA World Championships in Budapest.

McKeon found some unwanted headlines in Rio when she was banned from the closing ceremony – then given the green light to attend – after a night out where she failed to follow team security protocols.

But in the water, the softly spoken 22-year-old was a bulldog, proving she was up for the fight with a gold and two silvers in relays and a gutsy bronze in the 200-metre freestyle behind superstars Katie Ledecky and Sarah Sjostrom.

Now she wants to add some muscle to her lean frame and take her swimming to the next level, with the immediate goal an individual gold in Hungary.

“I’d love to get some more individual medals on the world stage,” said McKeon, who trains in Brisbane with coach Michael Bohl. “Getting relay medals is just as amazing … I feel just as proud to be a part of that as well. But it’s a different feeling, I think, getting an individual gold.

“I did win four medals [in Rio], but I’m not satisfied. I want to go higher and higher and keep improving.”

Part of that improvement could involve stepping up to the Dolphins leadership group. McKeon’s stocks only rose in Rio and she feels she’s ready to start mentoring some of the newer faces as they make their way through the ranks.

“That would be nice, to become more of a leader in the team,” she said. “I’ve been on the team for four years now, so I feel like I’ve come a long way and learned a lot about myself and dealing with certain things in swimming.

“I feel like it would be nice to share that with everyone else on the team and younger people joining the team in the future.

“Most of the team was pretty young, everyone was around my age, 22. It’s definitely exciting. A lot of us haven’t done a lot of that big international racing, those big meets. That experience is only going to help.”

McKeon was floored by the support she received during the closing ceremony drama and said that would only add to her resilience as a competitor.

“I’ve definitely come out as a stronger athlete and a stronger person,” she said. “There were times that were difficult and times that were awesome. I’ve learned a lot more about myself and I’ve become more resilient, which is a good thing and can only help me in the future.

“You can do as much training, the hardest training, and you might get there and not perform how you wanted, not because of lack of training but maybe the pressure you are putting on yourself. That’s a major part of being a resilient athlete – it’s not just physical, it’s mental.”

Campbell is due to have surgery on a hernia and McKeon has no doubt the freestyle star can overcome her Rio disappointment and surge back to the top.

“Cate is an amazing athlete and an amazing person,” McKeon said. “She’s a very strong woman. She can get through anything. She still performed amazing over there, it was amazing to be part of the relay with here. I’m sure there’s much more to come.”

Continue reading »

Racing: Winx simply the best but Prince Of Penzance may never race again

Prince of Penzance, the horse who sprang to international fame a year ago will not  be able to defend his Melbourne Cup title and may never race again after breaking down at Caulfield on Saturday.

杭州桑拿

Not quite twelve months ago the Darren Weir-trained stayer gave Michelle Payne the honour of being the first woman to have Melbourne Cup success, however hopes of back-to-back cups are now over with the seven-year-old requiring urgent surgery.

Just minutes after the stayer finished fourth in the Herbert Power Handicap, his trainer and raceday jockey were deeply concerned at the condition of the horse and his restricted action.

Veterinary x-rays revealed a fractured bone in his off foreleg that will require surgery.

Weir at first was hopeful of getting the horse down to his Warrnambool stable to have him bathing the leg in the salt water, but the veterinary advice was too grave for that option.

Weir was philosophical about the injury to the horse that gave him his first Melbourne Cup.

“He owes us nothing. He gave us a Melbourne Cup. You can’t ask any more. There will be some screws inserted into the area during the operation and we’ll just wait and see what his future will be after he comes through the procedure,” he said.

Prince of Penzance was attempting what only great stayers have achieved by winning back-to-back Melbourne Cups, and sadly those ambitions have finished with the injury from the race on Saturday.

On the same day, one of the world’s finest race mares Winx took a tighter grip on this year’s group 1 Cox Plate after she ambled around Caulfield to win the Caulfield Stakes.

Winx, the unflappable champion mare from Sydney, was the main drawcard at Caulfield when she cruised away from her two rivals to notch another major race win.

“It’s wonderful to be associated with such a great mare, but you don’t win all the time. I read Sunday papers myself and sometimes you don’t like what you read,” Chris Waller said.

“But she’s a total professional, she does what she has to do and, as I’ve said before, she’s been in nine barrier trials and the closest she’s finished is third.”

When Waller was asked about the perceived clash with Hartnell in two weeks’ time, he replied: “It won’t just be Hartnell. It’ll be a very good race with some strong overseas competitors up against us.

“But what it does mean is that we’re going to have a great spring.”

Runner-up Black Heart Bart will still head to the Cox Plate despite being comfortably beaten in the Caulfield Stakes.

“We were just not good enough but we’ll push on to the Cox Plate, the prize money for placegetters is still very strong.” Earlier in the day, the Lloyd Williams-owned Assign took a significant step towards gaining a start in this year’s Melbourne Cup following his win in the Herbert Power Stakes, Weir said.

And the Cox Plate may have another dimension to it with Caulfield Guineas winner Divine Prophet now being considered for the weight-for-age championship of Australia.

After a remarkable ride by Dwayne Dunn, Divine Prophet weaved his way through to win the Guineas and in doing so substantially boosted his breeding profile and price in the future.

Co-trainer Wayne Hawkes said they had expected a performance like Saturday’s effort and added the drawing of barrier one was a critical point in the three-year-old’s favour.

“I must’ve said 4000 times that barriers are so important in races. My brother Michael contacted me at 4am this morning and asked how the horse had eaten up and I said he had licked his bin out and he said he’s a great horse,” Hawkes said.

“Michael is a good judge and I’m a bit emotional. The Cox Plate, well there’s Winx and Divine Prophet, we’ll put the horse first, we had the race favourite some years ago in Lonhro and we pulled the pin on him running because we didn’t think he was right. If there’s any problem, he’ll be on a float to the paddock.”

And if Divine Prophet does back up in a fortnight’s time, this year’s Cox Plate could well and truly be a classic with some outstanding local Australians, one very good three-year-old and some unknown internationals.

The Sydney clean sweep of Saturday’s meet at Caulfield continued when leading trainer Gai Waterhouse won her first Thousand Guineas when Global Glamour proved superior in the Fillies Classic.

Assign will now go to the Bendigo Cup to further enhance his chances of being at Flemington on the first Tuesday in November.

And Yankee Rose also came into Cox Plate consideration when she was successful in the Champion Stakes at Randwick.

The three-year-old filly was ridden by Melbourne jockey Dean Yendall who achieved the first group 1 success of his career.

Continue reading »

Racing: Dunn lands group 1 double on He’s Our Rokki as Hayes lands four-timer

Dwayne Dunn wins the Toorak Handicap aboard He’s Our Rokki at Caulfield. Photo: Vince Caligiuri Just one race before delivering a group 1 for Hayes aboard He’s Our Rokki, Dwayne Dunn denies him another, winning the Caulfield Guineas aboard Divine Prophet ahead of Hayes’ fast-finishing Seaburge. Photo: Vince Caligiuri

杭州桑拿

It was a red-letter day at Caulfield for the Hayes family training partnership and top jockey Dwayne Dunn, who landed, respectively, a four-timer and a hat-trick.

Dunn scored his first ever group 1 double and the Hayes yard picked up a group 1 with perhaps Australia’s most improved galloper, He’s Our Rokki, who got through late under Dunn’s urgings to take out the Toorak Handicap.

It was particularly special for the trainer as it was the first group 1 winner that his son Ben, who has joined the Hayes/Tom Dabernig training partnership this season, has been involved in.

Dunn brought a touch of levity to proceedings, when he revealed after the race that the trainer had threatened to flatten him in the mounting yard before he went out to ride the heavily backed $2.50 favourite.

In the previous race, Dunn had denied Hayes the chance of another group 1 winner – and a fifth for the day – when he got home on Divine Prophet in the Caulfield Guineas, just staving off the late challenge of the Hayes-trained outsider Seaburge, who flashed home late for second place.

“It’s the first time I have ever had a group 1 double. It’s pretty enormous, it doesn’t happen every day. You are going on the favourite in that race, there’s a bit of pressure,” the jockey said.

“Hayes wanted to punch me up before that race. Then he said, ‘I will leave it until after this one until I see how you go’. Hopefully now he’s copped it on the chin and we have moved on,” the jockey joked.

Dunn – who also won the Thoroughbred Club Stakes aboard $9.50 chance Hear The Chant for the Hayes/Dabernig partnership – praised the way the Hayes stable had brought He’s Our Rokki patiently through his grades to the point where he could become a group 1 winner in one of the most famous races on the Australian calendar.

“He’s come from nowhere but placing him in the B Grade he’s got confidence. He’s done well and now he’s ready for the big league which he handled really well. Maybe this time next year they can look to stretch him towards the Cox Plate.”

Hayes said that it was easy to avoid the temptation of running in the Cox Plate this year given the awesome performance by Winx earlier in the day.

“We will play chicken and run for a million dollars the week after (in the newly named Longines Mile, formerly the Emirates). I saw enough of her today.

“I have got two horses in a normal year – him and Seaburge – who would have a crack at the Cox Plate, but this would be the year to watch it. With the great mare in great form its a mission impossible, its not a normal Cox Plate year, so I will be skirting the packs.”

Continue reading »

Deakin University builds darkroom as students click with film photography

Student April Brown in the recently opened darkroom at Deakin University’s Waterfront campus in Geelong. Photo: Jason South Students working in the recently opened darkroom at Deakin University’s Waterfront campus in Geelong. Photo: Jason South

杭州桑拿

Student April Brown: ”Going out into the industry, people like to see you using analog or alternative methods.” Photo: Jason South

A Geelong campus has built a darkroom to help it keep up with student demand for black-and-white film photography skills.

Deakin University’s Waterfront campus opened the facility this year and has dozens of fine-arts students learning the value of a single, well-composed shot.

It’s not quite a return to cooperage and quill pens, but it is about learning the building blocks of a digitised art form, according to photography lecturer Daniel Armstrong.

He was around  when digital photography was becoming mainstream and Deakin staff debated whether to knock down the darkroom at its Burwood campus. That darkroom survived and students have always been keen to use it. Deakin wanted to offer the same basic black-and-white film skills at Geelong.

“Finding new equipment was difficult, but there has never been a better time to get hold of second-hand equipment,” Mr Armstrong said. It can be difficult to find replacement parts, but 3D printing may solve that problem, he added.

“Some of our students have set up their own darkrooms at home and have said it isn’t difficult to find equipment,” he said.

Student April Brown, 23, said her father was thrilled when she started learning how to use a Mamiya C330 medium-format camera, the same model he once had.

“He sold his medium format [camera], but had a 35-millimetre camera that I now use,” Ms Brown said.

She is studying creative arts at the university with a major in photography. She hopes analog technology will differentiate her artwork and skills when looking for a job.

“Going out into the industry, people like to see you using analog or alternative methods,” she said. “If you have an analog camera, it has a bit of a novelty factor.”

She said developing her own pictures had improved her skills with digital cameras.

“You have to be considerate of the tone that you are photographing,” she said. “Seeing the process that you need to take to get the perfectly exposed photograph on analog probably makes you more considerate in digital.”

Many tertiary schools that kept their darkrooms have found renewed interest in manual photography.

“RMIT has popular darkroom facilities at two campuses,” an RMIT spokeswoman said. “The number of students using them has been increasing and there are no plans to close them at this time.”

Photography is taught for fine art and scientific photography, she said.

According to Mr Armstrong, one big difference with analog photography this century is the absence of heavy metals.

“Selenium toning was a popular practice in a lot of darkrooms,” he said. “It warms the print. [But] there is no way we would let selenium in now because it is a toxic chemical and can poison you. Some of those things now are lost arts.”

Today’s students use a machine for all the fixing, washing and drying, although they do use trays for enlarging and developing.

Students use a multi-grade plastic-based paper, but supplies of original photography paper occasionally pop up on eBay.

Mr Armstrong believes students will always be interested in analog photography, but the biggest hurdle will be finding supplies of materials that are no longer made.

“I think the interest is indefinite, because as time goes by there’s a different interest in it – from the technical side to the historic aspect,” Mr Armstrong said. “We think the interest in it will be ongoing, at least into the next 10 years, when it may come down to a lack of equipment and resources.”

Students in Geelong go to a local cafe called Analogue Academy to buy second-hand analog cameras, Ms Brown said.

Most cameras come from “grandpas cleaning out their garages”, who sell them on consignment for about $100, Analogue Academy owner Dan Horvat said. The old 1970s metal models such as Minolta SR-T 101, Pentax K1000 and Canon AE-1 don’t stay on the shelf for very long.

“We are not really in it for the big profits; we just want to enable a film community,” Mr Horvat said. “We believe that film teaches people to slow down and think about what they are photographing and consider what their artistic abilities are.”

Continue reading »

Bathurst 1000, 2016: All the colour from the race.

Colour at the Bathurst 1000 | Photos Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

杭州桑拿

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

Colour and action off track at the 2016 Bathurst 1000. Photo: GETTY IMAGES

TweetFacebook

Continue reading »