Woman dead and two injured in a jet ski collision in Nerong

The power boat involved in the crash in Nerong on Friday. Photo: Twitter / Nine News SydneyA woman was killed and a child injured after their jet ski collided with a power boat in an inlet on the NSW mid north coast.

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She has been remembered as a “lovely person” who was a very good neighbour in her community.

The 54-year-old died at the scene of the crash, which occurred about 5.30pm on Friday, while the eight-year-old boy suffered a broken leg, according to NSW Police.

The crash occurred on the Nerong Inlet at Nerong, which is an hour’s drive south of Forster or north of Newcastle.

The boy was taken to John Hunter Hospital. He is in a stable condition and will soon undergo surgery.

“They weren’t life threatening injuries,” Acting Inspector Troy Kauter of Manning Great Lakes Local Area Command said.

A 46-year-old man, the boat’s skipper, and a child were aboard the white Reinell power boat at the time of the crash.

It’s understood he sustained a broken nose and fractured ribs, but was discharged from John Hunter Hospital on Friday night.

The child who was on the power boat was not injured.

Local police and Marine Area Command officers are investigating the crash.

“We are mindful of the tragedy that has befallen everyone involved and what sort of affect last night’s events would have had,” said Marine Area Command’s Superintendent Mark Hutchings.

“The boat has been taken to a secure location for forensic examination.”

A friend of the deceased woman told the ABC she was a “lovely person” who was a “a very good neighbour, working neighbour”.

He said she was confident and experienced on the water.

“It’s just a tragic accident and the police now have to work out what went wrong,” he told the ABC.

“We’ve never had an accident here before — to my knowledge there’s never been a bang or anything like that here and I use the waterways myself.”

A report will be prepared for the Coroner.

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Shannen Doherty candidly shares post-chemo dance class, time with her mum

Shannen Doherty has continued to candidly share moments from her breast cancer journey on social media, this time revealing her favourite thing to do the day after receiving chemotherapy is go to dance class.

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The former 90210 actor had a booty-shaking session with celebrity trainer Jäm Malibu on Friday.

“After chemo day. I believe that just moving helps so much in the healing process,” Doherty wrote on Instagram.

“It’s not always easy and sometimes I can’t do it the next day but I try to make an effort to get the blood flowing and the toxins out of my body thru [sic] working out.”   After chemo day. I believe that just moving helps so much in the healing process. It’s not always easy and sometimes I can’t do it the next day but I try to make an effort to get the blood flowing and the toxins out of my body thru working out. Some days are easy workouts and other days I push it but the key is to MOVE!!! This is for any illness. Obviously check with your doctor. The road to recovery is paved with all sorts of different material. #beastmode #fightlikeagirl #warriorA video posted by ShannenDoherty (@theshando) on Oct 6, 2016 at 3:33pm PDT   Let me tell ya…. shaking your booty is hard work with my Neda who’s been helping me move and get toxins out. Yes I was tired, yes I wanted to be in bed but I went and moved and felt way better. Any exercise during illness is good. We can do it!!! #beastmode with @jammalibu #fightlikeagirl #warriorA video posted by ShannenDoherty (@theshando) on Oct 6, 2016 at 7:30pm PDT

Malibu shared the video to her own Instagram account, writing that she was “beyond proud” of Doherty.

In a later post, Doherty showed herself having some downtime with her mother, Rosa.   And sometimes you just want to collapse on the couch and watch tv with your mom. I love you mom. @themamarosa #fightlikeagirlA photo posted by ShannenDoherty (@theshando) on Oct 6, 2016 at 10:47pm PDT

The posts came a day after Doherty shared video footage of her undergoing treatment to her Instagram account.

“Chemo day. I’m lucky to have such a great team!” Doherty captioned the video, which has been viewed over 500,000 times and was flooded with supportive comments from her fans.   Chemo day. I’m lucky to have such a great team!!! Dawn has been taking care of me from pretty much the start along with Dr Piro, Joyce, Rosie, Kathy and everyone else at the clinic. I don’t enjoy chemo day or needle like things in my chest or my port but, at least with this crew it’s not so bad. Make sure you connect not only with your oncologist but also with the person administering your chemo. Thank you to The Angeles Clinic.A video posted by ShannenDoherty (@theshando) on Oct 5, 2016 at 11:21am PDT

Doherty revealed she had been diagnosed with breast cancer in August 2015.

The actress was forced to disclose her diagnosis after TMZ reported she was suing her former manager for cutting off her health insurance, which resulted in her failing to attend regular doctors’ check ups during the time at which the cancer could have been discovered.

Since her diagnosis, Doherty has been open in sharing her journey via her social media channels.

In July, she documented the act of shaving her head in a series of poignant, black and white pictures posted on Instagram.

Fairfax Media

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Tracker mortgages: how banks could be made to treat us like everyone else

How banks work. Photo: REGIS MARTIN.Our biggest banks could be forgiven for thinking they’ve survived the worst. Coached within an inch of their lives by crisis management teams, their chiefs batted off 12 hours of questions before the parliament’s economics committee this week without too much apparent damage.

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But the committee is yet to report. When it does, there’s a chance it’ll recommend something every bit as frightening to the banks as a royal commission. It’s called a “tracker mortgage” and it would force them to work for their money rather than take it. It would give the rest of us the same rights in our dealings with banks as we have in our dealings with just about with everyone else. Who else other than banks can change the price of what we’ve bought after we’ve bought it?

Energy companies can’t. They sign us up to contracts that offer a fixed percentage off a regulated price. During the term of the contract the price can change, but only in accordance with changes in the regulated price. Nor can builders, painters, dentists and all manner of other service providers. They charge what we’ve contracted to pay, whether they end up liking it or not.

Kevin Davis, research director at the Australian Centre for Financial Studies, points out that bank executives are paid handsomely for managing risk, but that in Australia they are able to pass most of that risk onto their customers. “A bank which is funding housing loans in a way which subsequently becomes relatively expensive can simply increase the rate it charges to existing borrowers,” he writes in a submission to a Senate inquiry. “A bank which had its credit rating downgraded and faced higher funding costs could pass that onto both existing and new borrowers, rather than it impinging directly on shareholder profits”.

It can’t happen in the United States, Japan, Korea, Canada, or most of the countries with which we usually like to compare ourselves. There the banks contract to charge a fixed amount over an indicator rate for the term of the contract. Visitors from those countries find our completely variable rates “amazing”. Davis says he is not sure why we are unusual. He says it could be because our contract evolved before the 1980s when rates were subject to a government cap. When the cap was removed “the characteristics of the mortgage contract were not reviewed”.

He wants the government to prohibit loan contracts “which give lenders absolute discretion to change the interest rate on existing loans”. It wouldn’t mean tying mortgage rates to the Reserve Bank’s cash rate. It would have to be a rate more relevant to their predictable funding costs such as the 180 day bank bill rate. Or the banks could offer fixed rates as they do already. The Greens agree, and the questions asked in this week’s hearing suggest other members of parliament are warming to the idea.

It’d salvage something lasting out of what to the banks has been an exercise in PR.

Peter Martin is economics editor of The Age.

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Andrew Gaze channels Paul Roos as the Sydney Kings set out to change their culture

Culture comes first: Andrew Gaze is overhauling the Sydney Kings, on and off the court. Photo: Wolter Peeters In charge: Gaze takes control at Kings training. Photo: Wolter Peeters

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New look side: Gaze with the new Kings. Photo: Chris Hyde

Passion for the game: Gaze is still as animated coaching as he was playing. Photo: Wolter Peeters

Andrew Gaze is not trying to win a championship. Well, not in his first year anyway.

One of the biggest names in Australian basketball is out to reform the Sydney Kings and rebuild the club, on and off the court, rather than simply putting together a team that will deliver instant gratification.

Modelling himself on legendary Sydney Swans coach Paul Roos, whose rejuvenation of the Swans in the mid-2000s led to the 2005 and 2012 premierships, as well as three other grand final appearances, Gaze is out to forge new ground for the glamour club of Australian basketball.

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Implementing the famous “no dickheads policy” that the Swans employed under Roos’ reign, Gaze has recruited a roster of big Australian names, such as Kevin Lisch, who will lead the team in 2016-17, while keeping only a few players from last season’s wooden-spoon side. Gaze has complemented the squad with two young Americans – Greg Whittington and Michael Bryson – who are fresh out of college.

The idea behind the recruitments is to forge a culture that puts the Sydney Kings first – and the individual second.

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The Kings recently returned from a four-game tour of China and have signed Bo Liu on a development contract; the first Chinese-born player to sign with an NBL team, reinforcing this relationship and the growing importance of Asian basketball.

And while the NBL has struggled with an “unhealthy” concoction of teams entering and exiting the competition, Gaze now believes the league is in a strong position.

He puts this strength down to one key element: uncertainty of outcome.

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Illawarra ‘panther’ spotted at Seacliff Bridge escarpment selfie spot

DANGER: A warning scrawled on the signpost to the Wodi Wodi track, near Stanwell Park, records a December, 2012 encounter. Is there a big black cat on the Illawarra escarpment?Illawarra ‘panther’: speculation of escarpment sightings quashed’Illawarra panther’ leaves sisters terror-strickenIllawarra panther picture provokes photo frenzy: photosThe sun had fallen behind the escarpment on Sunday as Alex Vourliotis headed higher up the sea-facingslope at Coalcliff, his spirits buoyed by fine weatherand the postcard-worthy sight ofSeacliff Bridgesnaking away below.

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EYES PEELED: Alex Vourliotis and Tanaya Webb were pursuing the perfect selfie in the escarpment at Coalcliff when Mr Vourliotis realised they weren’t alone.

The Albion Park personal trainer and his partner Tanaya Webb had made a leisurely visit to thescenic spot,so the two could get a photo together.

But they beat a hasty retreat home;Mr Vourliotis witha racingheart and a firm belief thathe had seen for himself the Illawarra ‘panther’ –thebig, blackcat said to roam the region’s green border.

Mr Vourliotis told the Mercuryhis gaze was fixed on the bush when he caught something dark moving in the upper reaches of his field of vision at about 5.30pm.

Heestimates he was standing 15 metres away when the creature turned and ran,jumping a tree root before disappearing behind a tree.

“I’d say it wasthe size of a full-grown dog, maybe like a German Shepherd,” he said.

“The way it jumped–it didn’t jump like a dog and it didn’t jump like a cat, but it was on all fours.I immediately thought it was a panther.

“Ifroze, and didn’t know what to or say.”

The encounter lasted only about two seconds.

Mr Vourliotis, 26,said the creature’ssolid legs contributed to his belief that it was not a dog.

He followed it a short distance, and believes he spotted it a second time in a dark pocket of overgrown bush.

He said he realisedhis vulnerable position and retreated.

“It was a dark part of the bush and I swear I could see its eyes –I swear I saw it blink –thenI heard a thud right next to it,” he said.

“I got too scared and turned away. If it had attacked me there was no way I could defend myself or [Tanaya].

“I was shaking. That’s how confident I was I seen something.

“I’m a sceptic in general–I’m not a big believer until I feel or see something.”

The Illawarra and surrounds have produced sporadic big cat sightings over the years, including sightings at Austinmer’s Sublime Point track in 2014 and 2015 and along the Wodi Wodi track near Stanwell Park.

There, a trekker has used the signpost to recordan alleged encounter on December 31, 2012.

The sightings –and numerous others along the state’s east coast –have given rise to theories about escaped circus animals and one-time exotic pets.

A less colourful theory– favoured by some farmers, in particular–is that the sightings are of feral cats that have grown far bigger than the household variety of cat.

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